The Supposed “Liberal Media”

The supposed “stigma” against political incorrectness is exaggerated by the media.
Journalists pretend to make a big deal about everything so their articles could get more views.
Journalists pretend to make a big deal about every nuance, subtlety coming out of every politician’s mouth, sometimes deliberately taking their words out of context, just so they could make their articles sound more sensational to get more views.
So the stuff in the media is deliberately sensationalized/exaggerated.
There’s no “PC police” in the media. It’s all deliberately sensationalized/exaggerated to get more views.

Journalists write stuff like “OMG Trump is against Muslim immigration! What a racist!”, but just about every other candidate is against Muslim immigration too. (Banning immigrants from Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq basically excludes 99% of the Muslim immigrants. Almost every other politician wants to ban or severely restrict immigration from these countries, which is in effect a ban.)

Journalists write stuff like “OMG Trump likes to keep a database of Muslims! He’s like Hitler”, but Muslim-targeted spying is already practiced by the NSA.

Journalists write stuff like “OMG Trump wants to kill the families of terrorists! What a fascist!”, but just about every other candidate is the same. (Bombs will inevitably kill innocent people, and Obama has deliberately bombed funerals of alleged “terrorists” to kill their families.)

But the journalists cannot write such things about the other candidates because that would be an opinion piece instead of an actual news report. Opinion pieces get much less views than actual news reports, and they cannot be in the actual, visible news headlines.

Feminist writers “spin” news events to affirm their feminist theories.
Anti-racist writers “spin” news events to affirm their anti-racist views.
But that’s not the PC police. They are just opportunists who want to interpret everything to legitimize their theories, sometimes deliberately interpreting things out of context to prove a point.

Trump is popular because of his supposed “non-PC” rhetoric. You know what? The “fear of being political incorrect” has become mainstream. Trump exploits this very fact and makes his supporters think that they are supposedly “victims” of the “PC majority”. This is what’s responsible for Trump’s rising popularity. But Trump is actually very mainstream. It’s the deliberately sensationalized media that makes them feel like they are the “victimized minority”.

Assad is a brutal puppet

Assad is a brutal dictator and is a puppet of Russia.

Assad’s government shot peaceful protesters. Assad’s government shot peaceful Kurdish protests; Kurds are denied some rights like having their language banned. It attacked two prominent members of the Kurdish Future Movement Party; assassinating one and beating up one. The Assad government also detains allegedly those who oppose the regime or people are insufficiently loyal to it and some of them are tortured, raped and killed. Relatives of the dead detainees have identified them as everything from civilian activists, to journalists, to bloggers who blog against Assad to a teenager whose crime was listening to anti-Assad music. As woman was tortured and beaten up for having a voice recorder. There are 50,000 detainees at any one time and thousands have been killed. The Assad army executed captured soldiers and civilians. The Assad army, with the help of foreign pro-Assad militias, have committed sectarian massacres against civilians, for example, the Bayda and Baniyas massacres where they killed up to hundreds of people, including entire families. The Assad government had executed prisoners in response to defeat by the Islamic State. As of February 2016, the Syrian Center for Policy Research said that 470,000 Syrians died on all sides of the Syrian Civil War. The Center for Documentation of Violations in Syria documented 130,000 deaths as of February 2016, 90,000 of those being civilians, 10% being children.

Human Rights Watch’s report, If the Dead Could Speak, has verified photographs smuggled from an Assad defector. Included were photographs of people who were dead from a facility; many were tortured, beaten and starved to death. The United Nations’ report, Out of Sight, Out of Mind, reported that there are tens of thousands of detainees at any one time and thousands have died. It reported torture, rape and starvation of detainees who allegedly oppose the Assad government or are insufficiently loyal to it. This includes children. Foreign fighters who are allied with the Assad government had massacred soldiers and civilians, including alleged beheadings.

Assad’s barrel bombs created casualties, 99% of the casualties are civilians and only 1% are combatants. That’s the civilian/combatant fatality ratio for barrel bombs. Of course the civilian/combatant fatality ratio different for other forms of combat. That’s why some statistics still show that most of the people killed are combatants instead of civilians.

Assad might also be bombing his peaceful opposition, calling them “terrorists”. That might the reason why 99% of the casualties from his barrel bombs were civilians.

Both Putin and Assad each killed six times as many people as “extremist Islamist groups” combined; with “90% of the wide and individual attacks targeted civilians and civil points.” (The U.S. commonly confuse ISIS fighters with civilians too and civilians are slaughtered by the airstrikes. One leaked U.S. government document revealed that, in Pakistan, 90% of the casualties were not the intended targets.) The 90% civilian statistic might suggest that Putin may be killing the peaceful opposition; Assad “directs” some of Putin’s airstrikes anyway.

Assad denies the torture and murder of prisoners. But Assad and the Russian government also denies other stuff. Assad denies using barrel bombs even though there is video footage of helicopters dropping barrel bombs. Russia denies using cluster bombs even there is video footage of cluster bombs and there are pictures of unexploded bomblets from cluster bombs.

Assad held elections but the authenticity of the elections are disputed.

CWj5WT_VAAAxZwC.png large

The results claim that 100% to 99% supported Assad but this was contradicted by a survey from Syrian refugees in Germany. A majority of them does not like Assad and blamed Assad for the Syrian Civil War. This is more than the people who blamed the Islamic State. However, this does not mean that they accept the Islamic State either.

Fifty-two percent said they could only return to Syria with the departure of Assad, while 42 percent said they would return to Syria only after the departure of Islamic State (ISIS). Free elections would be a condition for 42 percent of those surveyed, while the majority—67.8 percent—simply said that the “the war has to stop” before they would consider returning. Eight percent said they did not want to go back.

There is further evidence of vote fraud. If Assad had gotten 88% of the vote, then why did 11 million people flee from Syria, which is 50% of the Syrian population in 2011 before the war? Egyptian dictator Sisi also had a suspicious vote.

The Assad regime has lost its legitimacy because it bombs its own people and tortures and kills the peaceful opposition. The Assad army, including foreign pro-Assad militias, have committed sectarian massacres against civilians. Any state who does this would lose its legitimacy. In Egypt for example the Sisi regime is unpopular to some people because it detains and tortures its peaceful opposition and killed thousands of peaceful demonstrators.

Some people would rather live under the Islamic State than the Assad regime that bombs its own people.

A resident of Al-Bab, an ISIS-held territory whose market last month was decimated by a regime barrel bomb, killing up to 50 people, said: “Civilians would rather live under monkeys than under Bashar al-Assad.

“They would choose anything than a regime that has been bombings its own people. Under ISIL we can exist, but still, we live in fear.”

People would rather live under the Islamic State than risk being bombed. If not then why did the secular Ba’athist and Sufi militias ally with the Islamic State rather than the Iraqi regime in Baghdad?

This does not mean that the U.S. should intervene and overthrow Assad. Instead, Russia should stop defending Assad. The U.S. should also stop funding and arming the Iraqi government as it is brutal as well.

External links

Syria: Mass Deaths and Torture in Detention
Assad troops dropped barrel bombs on the city
Obama / Assad airstrike on bus
Obama / Assad airstrike on bus 2
Children bombed

Myth: Saudi Arabia is better than the Islamic State

Summary: The Islamic State is not like Nazi Germany. Many of the allegations of genocide against Christians, Shiites and Yazidis are untrue or exaggerated. There is no clear evidence that there was a “Sinjar massacre” by the Islamic State. Saudi Arabia and the Islamic State are virtually identical as both execute people for adultery, treason and sodomy; both butcher hands off as punishment for theft; both practice public beheadings.

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There is a lot of bias and propaganda against the Islamic State but in reality the Islamic State isn’t a lot worse than Saudi Arabia if you examine the evidence carefully.

Saudi Arabia and the Islamic State are both Wahhabi and are virtually identical. Both states execute people for apostasy, witchcraft, sorcery and gay sex. Just like the Islamic State, Saudi Arabia also commits public beheadings, but the footage is usually censored. Just like the Islamic State, Saudi Arabia butchers the hand off as punishment as thieves.

The difference is that while the Islamic State is honest, Saudi Arabia is dishonest and censors footage.

Many of the allegations of genocide against Christians, Shiites and Yazidis are untrue or exaggerated. There is no clear evidence that there was a “Sinjar massacre” by the Islamic State.

Probably the only thing that distinguishes the Saudis and ISIS is that the ISIS perpetuates terrorist attacks abroad (in retaliation to attacks against ISIS) and it kills people fleeing. Otherwise, there’s little difference, so it’s pointless anyway to attack ISIS while not attacking Saudi Arabia.

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http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/crime-and-punishment-islamic-state-vs-saudi-arabia-1588245666
Crime & Punishment: Islamic State (ISIS) vs. Saudi Arabia
http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/crime-and-punishment-islamic-state-vs-saudi-arabia-1588245666
http://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21618918-possible-reasons-mysterious-surge-executions-other-beheaders
http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/crime-and-punishment-islamic-state-vs-saudi-arabia-1588245666

Myth: Sweden is the “rape capital” due to immigration

A commonly mentioned statistic quoted by people against immigration is this:

Forty years after the Swedish parliament unanimously decided to change the formerly homogenous Sweden into a multicultural country, violent crime has increased by 300% and rapes by 1,472%. Sweden is now number two on the list of rape countries, surpassed only by Lesotho in Southern Africa.

But we will attempt to refute this myth.

This is a chart showing reported rape incidence:

un-police-reported-rape

Also:

Sweden’srape statistics show an increase of 1,472 per cent since 1975 – the year Sweden’s parliament decided to make Sweden more multicultural

Due to this, Sweden is known as the “rape capital”.

However, it’s not entirely due to immigration.

A lot of the increase has to do with Sweden’s feminist laws which record rape cases differently:

“In Sweden there has been this ambition explicitly to record every case of sexual violence separately, to make it visible in the statistics,” she says.

“So, for instance, when a woman comes to the police and she says my husband or my fiance raped me almost every day during the last year, the police have to record each of these events, which might be more than 300 events. In many other countries it would just be one record – one victim, one type of crime, one record.”

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-19592372

Firstly, in Sweden there is a noticeably broad definition of what constitutes rape. This means that more acts in Sweden are regarded and registered as rape than in the majority of other countries. Secondly, in Sweden a lot of effort is made to register all cases that can be suspected to be rape. As this is done at a very early stage of the process, cases are included that later turn out to be some other sex crime, or even no crime at all. In addition to this, all individual acts are registered — not just the latest occasion or the main crime. In many other countries cases like these are filtered out and do not show up in the statistics.

And it is not only in the area of rape where these differences are noticeable. Sweden stands out within the entire area of crimes against the person in particular, because the registration of crime is more extensive than in the majority of other countries in Europe. This forms the background to, for example, the fact that ten times as many cases of assault are registered in Sweden as in Greece.

https://www.bra.se/bra/bra-in-english/home/news-from-bra/archive/news/2011-01-18-how-common-is-rape-in-sweden-compared-to-other-european-countries.html

A girl who drank some alcohol, flirts with a man, precedes to make out with the man, and then had her vagina penetrated by a finger, but later regrets it, it is considered “rape”. It is considered “rape” even if the male couldn’t tell if the woman was drunk.

(Many Islamophobes and xenophobes cite Sweden to justify their position against immigration. I have disproven this.)

See also: https://debunkingdenialism.com/2015/12/12/how-anti-immigration-activists-misuse-rape-statistics/

Footage of “victory” and “liberation” of Syrian and Iraqi cities

Syria has been barrel-bombing rebel-held cities but the fatalities of the barrel bombs are 99% civilians and 1% combatants. Russia has used cluster-bombs which is known to cause high civilian causalities in Syria.

Cities are being destroyed and civilians are being killed by Syrian. Here is a video footage taken from a drone of a city called Homs which is destroyed by Syrian barrel-bombs and Russian bombs (possibly cluster-bombs).

This is what “liberation” looks like. People are killed and their homes are being destroyed.

The United States has also done the same thing to cities like Ramadi. Iraq has captured the city of Ramadi held by the Islamic State (IS), but they (along with U.S./Coalition bombings) basically destroyed the entire city with a population of up to 300,000, even though there were only very few IS fighters there. A lot of people celebrated, but there’s nothing to celebrate when this operation has probably murdered civilians (probably much more than the Islamic State itself) and the city was taken by the Shiite-dominated Iraqi government which is oppressive against Sunnis.

A couple of weeks before the capture, the Iraqi government warned the citizens of Ramadi (a population of up to 300,000) to flee. But most of its citizens didn’t due to fear that the I.S. will shoot them. (It’s illegal to flee from I.S.)

“To our people in the city of Ramadi, evacuate your families from the city immediately and go to the south through al Hameera area,” the leaflets read, according to the Iraqi military.

But leaving isn’t necessarily easy. Ramadi residents told CNN on Monday night that ISIS had set up additional checkpoints around the city to prevent people from fleeing.

“Daesh made it very clear to all of us that anyone who tries to flee the city will be considered an apostate. And you know what they will do to an apostate,” said one resident, referring to ISIS’ practice of detaining and killing those who don’t accept its extreme ideology.

Another told CNN that most people were unable to leave due to the threat of being caught fleeing by ISIS.

“(I’m) not going to take the risk,” he said. “The government is not proving us any guarantees that we will be safe during our trip south.”

But those citizens who refused to flee probably faced their own destruction. They were probably bombed and killed by the U.S. and their own Iraqi government as they retook the city. The Iraqi possibly have thought there are no civilians there as the Iraqi government has warned them to flee before.

Iraqi Defence Minister says that 80% of Ramadi is destroyed

How do you “take the ‘city’ back” when the city is already destroyed? How do you take something back when that thing is already destroyed and doesn’t exist anymore?

“Thousands of other homes have suffered varying degrees of damage,” Osej said.

“All water, electricity, sewage and other infrastructure — such as bridges, government facilities, hospitals and schools — have suffered some degree of damage,” he said.

http://news.yahoo.com/thousands-homes-destroyed-iraqs-ramadi-155841498.html

Last month government forces retook the city’s western and central districts under cover of heavy coalition air bombardment.

Lise Grande, the U.N.’s deputy special representative to Iraq, says the extent of the damage raises concerns about reconstruction, calling the destruction in Ramadi “incomparable” to destruction in other Iraqi cities taken back from IS.

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2016/01/17/un-report-thousands-ramadi-buildings-damaged-destroyed.html

The United States and its allies have pledged $50 million to a United Nations fund for reconstruction in Iraq, but Sabah Karhout, the head of the Anbar provincial council, estimated that rebuilding the city would require $12 billion.

The coalition’s successes in Kobani, Syria, and Sinjar, Iraq, have also left communities in ruins, with few resources to rebuild.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/08/world/middleeast/isis-ramadi-iraq-retaking.html

All of their homes are completely destroyed:

“In one neighborhood, he stood before a panorama of wreckage so vast that it was unclear where the original buildings had stood. He paused when asked how residents would return to their homes. ‘Homes?’ he said. ‘There are no homes.’”

Russia’s cluster bomb attack footage:

Unexploded bomblet from a cluster bomb:

An unexploded cluster bomblet is seen along a street after airstrikes by pro-Syrian government forces in the rebel held al-Ghariyah al-Gharbiyah town, in Deraa province, Syria February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Alaa Al-Faqir
An unexploded cluster bomblet is seen along a street after airstrikes by pro-Syrian government forces in the rebel held al-Ghariyah al-Gharbiyah town, in Deraa province, Syria February 11, 2016. REUTERS/Alaa Al-Faqir

Residential areas are being bombed by Russian and Syrian airstrikes:

image

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Refugees fleeing after Russia’s bombing of a city.
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U.S. “victory” in Ramadi.

Iraqi Security forces enter the heavy damaged downtown Ramadi, 70 miles (115 kilometers) west of Baghdad, Iraq, Sunday, Dec. 27, 2015. Islamic State fighters are putting up a tough fight in the militant-held city of Ramadi, slowing down the advance of Iraqi forces, Gen. Ismail al-Mahlawi, head of the Anbar military operations, said Sunday. (AP Photo/Osama Sami)

In this Sunday, Dec. 27, 2015 photo, Iraqi security forces raise an Iraqi flag near the provincial council building in central Ramadi, 70 miles (115 kilometers) west of Baghdad. Iraqi military forces on Monday retook a strategic government complex in the city of Ramadi from Islamic State militants who have occupied the city since May. (AP Photo/Osama Sami)

Destroyed buildings are seen in Ramadi December 24, 2015.  REUTERS/Stringer   EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE

Destroyed buildings are seen in Ramadi December 24, 2015.  REUTERS/Stringer   EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE

Smoke rises from Islamic State positions following a U.S.-led coalition airstrike as Iraqi Security forces advance their position in downtown Ramadi, 70 miles (115 kilometers) west of Baghdad, Iraq, Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2015. The advance of government forces in the Islamic State-held city of Ramadi is being hampered by suicide bombers, snipers and booby traps, Gen. Ismail al-Mahlawi, the head of Iraqi military operations in Anbar said. (AP Photo)

In this Sunday, Dec. 27, 2015 photo, Iraqi security forces raise an Iraqi flag near the provincial council building in central Ramadi, 70 miles (115 kilometers) west of Baghdad. Iraqi military forces on Monday retook a strategic government complex in the city of Ramadi from Islamic State militants who have occupied the city since May. (AP Photo/Osama Sami)

Iraqi Security forces enter the heavy damaged downtown Ramadi, 70 miles (115 kilometers) west of Baghdad, Iraq, Sunday, Dec. 27, 2015. Islamic State fighters are putting up a tough fight in the militant-held city of Ramadi, slowing down the advance of Iraqi forces, Gen. Ismail al-Mahlawi, head of the Anbar military operations, said Sunday. (AP Photo)

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Failed States and States of Failure

Iraq is a brutal puppet state

Summary: The Iraqi government is corrupt and brutal. ISIS is a resistance group against the Iraqi government and Iran-backed Shiite militias. The Iraqi government shoots peaceful protesters, shells and bombs residential areas. The Iraqi government detains Sunni Arabs. Its prisons have 30,000 to 50,000 detainees; 20% of those arrested are killed by torture. The Iraqi government has lost its legitimacy to hundreds of thousands of Sunni Arabs; hundreds of thousands had protested against the Iraqi government each week.

A lot of Sunni Arabs tolerate the Islamic State more than the Iraqi government in Baghdad. They are willing to passively accept the Islamic State and even ally with them to fight the Iraqi government. The Iraqi government is so brutal that the secular former Ba’ath party militias and Sunni Arab tribesman would ally with the Islamic State rather than the Iraqi government. Waging war against the Islamic State will only strengthen this alliance.

The solution is to stop funding and arming the official Iraqi government. In this way it could compromise and grant more rights to Sunni Arabs. Sunni Arabs in Iraq have already cautioned that there will inevitably be resistance groups (like ISIS) unless the official Iraqi government is fixed.

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Saudi Arabia and the Islamic State are both Wahhabi and are virtually identical. Both states execute people for apostasy, witchcraft, sorcery and gay sex. There is a lot of bias and propaganda against the Islamic State but in reality the Islamic State isn’t a lot worse than Saudi Arabia if you examine the evidence carefully. Its alleged massacres against Shiites, Yazidis and Christians are non-existent or are greatly exaggerated. Probably the only thing that distinguishes the Saudis and ISIS is that the ISIS perpetuates terrorist attacks abroad (in retaliation to attacks against ISIS) and it kills people fleeing. Otherwise, there’s little difference, so it’s pointless anyway to fight against ISIS.

The Islamic State is a resistance group fighting the corrupt and oppressive Iraqi government.

The Iraqi government in Baghdad holds 30,000 to 50,000 detainees in prison for “terrorism” which are held without trial. About 20% of the prisoners are tortured to death. It is known to carry out mass executions.

Christof Heyns, UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, said last year he was alarmed by reports of individuals who remain at risk of execution. “I am appalled about the level of executions in Iraq. I deeply deplore the executions carried out.”

“Death sentences and executions are being used on a horrendous scale,” Amnesty International’s Hadj Sahraoui said in the group’s recent report. “It is particularly abhorrent that many prisoners have been sentenced to death after unfair trials and on the basis of confessions they say they were forced to make under torture.”

Iraq just like Syria uses barrel bombs against its own population. Barrel bombs which have a high civilian/combatant ratio. Assad’s barrel bombs kill 1 combatant per 100 civilians.

U.S. and Iran-sponsored Shiite militias are allowed free reign by the Iraqi government and it has been known to carry out murder, forced displacement, hate crimes against Sunni Arabs.

The Iraqi government has lost its legitimacy to hundreds of thousands of Sunni Arabs. Massive protests came about:

Every Friday in Fallujah, for three months now, hundreds of thousands have demonstrated and prayed on the main highway linking Baghdad and Amman, which runs just past the outskirts of that city.

People in Fallujah, and the rest of Iraq’s vast Anbar province, are enraged at the government of Prime Minister Maliki. They say his security forces, heavily populated by members of various Shia militias, have been killing and detaining Sunnis in Anbar Province, as well as across much of Baghdad.

And then the Iraqi government kills peaceful protesters. They shelled residential areas resulting in hundreds of civilian deaths and killed opposition leaders.

A lot of Sunni Arabs tolerate the Islamic State more than the Iraqi government in Baghdad. They are willing to passively accept the Islamic State and even ally with them to fight the Baghdad Iraqi government. The Iraqi government is so brutal that the secular former Ba’ath party members and Sunni Arab tribesman would ally with the Islamic State rather than the Iraqi government.

Many of the allies of the Islamic state are secular or moderate. For example, the secular former Ba’ath Party militias and Sunni Arab tribesman are allied with the Islamic State. Waging war against the Islamic State will only strengthen the alliance between the secular Ba’ath Party militias, the Sunni Arab tribesman and the Wahhabi fighters. Many of the top officials within the Islamic State itself are secular like the ex-Saddam Ba’ath party members.

Secular Sunni Arabs, currently, are more worried about the Iraqi government and its Shiite militias than the Wahhabism of the Islamic State.

An Iraqi insurgent, who identified himself as a former Iraqi official and Ba’ath Party member, said that a broad coalition of ISIS fighters, Sunni Arab tribesmen and secular Ba’athist military officers have allied to depose the Shi’ite-led government of Prime Minister Nuri Al-Maliki. The insurgent, who went by the nom de guerre of “Abu Louay,” portrayed the situation unfolding in Iraq as a broad national revolt against the Baghdad central government.

“The majority of insurgents in [eastern Iraq] are Iraqi nationals, not Arab or foreign fighters,” the Ba’athist official said, maintaining that the insurgents’ objective is to “liberate Iraq from [Maliki’s] regime and the Iranian and US presence.”

The former [secular Ba’ath Party] Iraqi official said he was not concerned about ISIS hegemony in a post-Maliki Iraq. “The forthcoming system of governance will be determined by the Iraqi people,” he said.

He also sought to play down fears of ISIS imposing its own medieval-style Islamic caliphate across Iraq as a whole, saying “we will cross that bridge when we come to it.”

Despite the alliances between some Syrian rebels and the Islamic State, there is still infighting. There is fighting between al-Nusra and the Islamic State, and between the Islamic State and Syrian rebels. There is fighting between the moderate Islamist rebels and the puritanical Islamist rebels. Again, waging war against the rebels / Islamic State will only strengthen the alliances between the secular rebels (like the pro-Saddam militias) and moderate Islamist rebels (like the moderate Muslim Brotherhood) and the Islamic State.

So unless the root cause is addressed, unless the oppressive Iraqi government is fixed, there will inevitably be resistance groups against the Iraqi government.

The same with the Syrian government that bombs its own people and shoots and tortures peaceful protesters. Syrian barrel bomb casualties are 99% civilians and 1% rebel fighters. Syrian government commits mass execution and torture of detainees. There are at least 10,000 detainees at any one time between 2011 and 2015, some were arrested for being in the opposition or merely being insufficiently loyal to the government.

Videos of Shiite militias torturing and murdering Sunni Arabs:


Saudi Wahhabism is Unstable

It’s not easy for the Saudis to perpetually enforce Wahhabism in another country let alone their own country.

Saudi Wahhabism is already risking collapse. 5% of Saudis are “convinced atheists” despite the ban on atheism and other non-Muslim religions. 20% of Saudis are “nonbelievers” despite that apostasy is punishable to death.

The Saudi royal family’s relies on Wahhabi Islam to keep power. Without Wahhabi Islam the Saudi monarchy will lose legitimacy and collapse. That’s why the Saudi government place strict bans on Christianity, Judaism, atheism, etc. They won’t want to lose power. Also they actively promote Wahhabism using their oil revenues and U.S.-backed military aid.

Even with all of that (banning apostasy, banning other religions, using oil revenues to fund Wahhabism, allying with the U.S.) the Saudis are still struggling to stay in power. “Convinced atheists” in Saudi Arabia is already 5% and the “non-believers” are at 20%.

When the Iranian sanctions were eased, the Saudi felt very threatened by the competing source of oil. Without monopoly revesues on oil, they cannot use their oil revenues to promote its Wahhabism.

There is already a civil war against the Saudi puppet government in Yemen despite continued U.S. arming and training on the Saudi side.

So in summary, Wahhabism is an unstable religion, people would be quick to reject it because of its contradictions and restrictions.

Think about how the other Islamic countries like Indonesia, Malaysia and Bangladesh that abandoned their strict interpretation of Islam. In those countries women and gays have rights. They even had female heads-of-state.

In contrast the U.S. sanctions against Iran keeps the theocracy in power. There are secular and Islamist factions in Iran, but these factions do not fight against each other because they have a bigger common enemy (America). The secular and Islamist factions will only fight against one another if there is no common enemy (America). Progress in Iran can be made if the U.S. and the rest of the world establish friendly relations with Iran. Soon its Islam would be abandoned just like in Indonesia, Malaysia, etc.

How War Perpetuates Islamist Coalitions

How the Islamic State could collapse by itself if we stop fighting against it. There are many secular elements within the Islamic State.

Many of the allies of the Islamic State (including the fighters of the Islamic State itself) are secular and are not interested in terrorism. The motives aren’t necessarily religious.

Understanding that ISIS is at least on some level rational is necessary to make any sense of the group’s behavior. If all ISIS wanted to was kill infidels, why would they ally themselves with ex-Saddam Sunni secularist militias? If ISIS were totally crazy, how could they build a self-sustaining revenue stream from oil and organized crime rackets? If ISIS only cared about forcing people to obey Islamic law, why would they have sponsored children’s festivals and medical clinics in the Syrian territory they control? (To be clear, it is not out of their love for children, whom they are also happy to murder, but a calculated desire to establish control.)

Meanwhile, ISIS may alienate some its core Iraqi allies: militias who support a Saddam-style Sunni dictatorship. They’re generally secular and no fans of ISIS’s vision of Islamic law, and are only allied with it to fight the government. If ISIS’s Sunni allies turn against it, and the government does a better job making its rule look attractive, ISIS may lose the Sunni population — and most of its gains in northern Iraq.

Many of the ISIS leaders were generals from the Iraqi Republican Guard from the SECULAR Saddam Husein state.

Pape’s analysis is consistent with what Lydia Wilson found when she interviewed captured ISIS fighters in Iraq. “They are woefully ignorant about Islam and have difficulty answering questions about Sharia law, militant jihad, and the caliphate,” she recently wrote in The Nation. “But a detailed, or even superficial, knowledge of Islam isn’t necessarily relevant to the ideal of fighting for an Islamic State, as we have seen from the Amazon order of Islam for Dummies by one British fighter bound for ISIS.”

Many of them don’t like Assad because Assad executes, tortures and rapes people without trial, shoots peaceful protesters, and it uses barrel bombs against its own population. Many of them don’t like the Iraqi government because it executes, tortures and rapes people without trial, shoots peaceful protesters and it bombs its Western cities.

The real solution is not more arming and funding for the Syrian or Iraqi governments, they are just as brutal (if not more) as the Islamic State. Funding the Iraqi government will just make it worse. It will become more murderous against Sunni Iraqis. Just stop funding the Iraqi government. Therefore it will be forced to compromise with the oppressed Sunni population and grant more rights to them, so they needn’t to rebel in the first place.

Another solution is to stop bombing the Islamic State. What makes people join the Islamic State in the first place is because their relatives are killed by American, Syrian or Russian airstrikes. Islamic State membership tripled when the U.S. began airstrikes against them. Many join because they are unemployed and it’s the only way to feed themselves and their family. Not all Syrian rebels are Islamists. Many of Syrian rebels are secular. Furthermore, not all of the Islamists are puritanical Islamists. Some are moderate Islamists. And not all of the Islamist rebels are terrorists.

If there was no common enemy, the secular, the moderate Islamist and the Salafist factions will likely turn against one another. Furthermore, many of the Islamic State fighters themselves are secular; many are former secular Ba’ath Party members. The secular and Islamic factions won’t turn against one another unless the U.S. and Russia stops bombing them. As long as there are outside forces bombing them, they got bigger fish to fry rather than wasting energy resolving their secular and religious issues domestically. (See my last post.)

See the Anbar Awakening in 2006 when an alliance of secular Sunni tribes turned against al-Qaeda. But that was impeded by the U.S. troop surge in 2007 which forced the secular, Islamist and Salafist groups to ally together.

Similarly, during the Sino-Japanese war, the communists and the nationalists allied together to fend off the Japanese. After the Japanese was defeated, the alliance between the communist and nationalists were ended and they began fighting against each other.

An Iraqi insurgent, who identified himself as a former Iraqi official and Ba’ath Party member, said that a broad coalition of ISIS fighters, Sunni Arab tribesmen and secular Ba’athist military officers have allied to depose the Shi’ite-led government of Prime Minister Nuri Al-Maliki. The insurgent, who went by the nom de guerre of “Abu Louay,” portrayed the situation unfolding in Iraq as a broad national revolt against the Baghdad central government.

“The majority of insurgents in [eastern Iraq] are Iraqi nationals, not Arab or foreign fighters,” the Ba’athist official said, maintaining that the insurgents’ objective is to “liberate Iraq from [Maliki’s] regime and the Iranian and US presence.”

The former Iraqi official said he was not concerned about ISIS hegemony in a post-Maliki Iraq. “The forthcoming system of governance will be determined by the Iraqi people,” he said.

He also sought to play down fears of ISIS imposing its own medieval-style Islamic caliphate across Iraq as a whole, saying “we will cross that bridge when we come to it.”

So in other words, once the repressive Iraqi regime is toppled, the Islamic State, the Sunni Arab tribesman and the secular Ba’athist military officers will end their alliance and turn against each other.

Despite the alliances between some Syrian rebels and the Islamic State, there is still infighting. There is fighting between al-Nusra and the Islamic State, and between the Islamic State and Syrian rebels. There is fighting between the moderate Islamist rebels and the puritanical Islamist rebels. Again, waging war against the rebels / Islamic State will only strengthen the alliances between the secular rebels (like the pro-Saddam militias) and moderate Islamist rebels (like the moderate Muslim Brotherhood) and the Islamic State.

A lot of the fighters and commanders within ISIS are secular ex-Ba’ath Party members. ISIS is also allied with neo-Ba’athist militias and Sunni Arab tribesman who previously fought against al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI) in 2006-2007. Previously they were enemies against al-Qaeda but they became allies in their fight against U.S. occupation and the corrupt Iraqi government. Once their common enemy is defeated they will probably turn against each other just like what happened in 2006-2007. There is speculation that the secular factions of the Islamic State is using the Mujahideen fighters in ISIS to first conquer territory, and its long-term goal is to instigate a coup d’etat against the Islamic State turning it into a secular neo-Ba’athist organization. Just like how Saddam Hussein came into power through a coup d’etat.

In light of this history, it is reasonable to surmise that the ex-Baathists flying the ISIS flag today are covertly working to undermine ISIS’s caliphate and eventually achieve their own political goals. The FRLs may be allowing ISIS to do the hard work of fighting and carving out a Sunni-dominated tribal nation from Damascus to Fallujah to Mosul. Once that geographic goal has been achieved, it should not take much to depose the caliph and eliminate ISIS.

References

Many of the mainstream and Islamist rebel groups fighting Assad are also opposed to ISIS, and losses on the rebel side could offer an opportunity for the jihadists to attempt to expand their territory. Faced with an overwhelming assault by pro-Assad forces, some rebel fighters could also join jihadist groups, seeing them as the hegemonic force among the groups arrayed against the regime.

“If anything it pushes people back against the wall. Some will say, maybe ISIS is an option, so I think ISIS is not uncomfortable with this, so they’ll be around for the foreseeable future,” said Paul Salem, vice president for policy and research at the Middle East Institute in Washington.

http://time.com/4218477/syria-aleppo-isis-regime/

Syrian rebel group says merges with others to boost Aleppo fight

ISIS and Syrian Rebel Infighting

https://theintercept.com/2015/06/03/isis-forces-exbaathist-saddam-loyalists/

Lack of hard evidence of that the rapes and sexual assaults in Germany are committed by migrants

So far there is no sufficient evidence that the two reported rapes on New Years Eve in Germany were committed by asylum seekers. There were two rapes on that day in Germany but they were German nationals of Syrian ancestry.

There were only two alleged rapes in Germany on New Year’s Eve. But the two “rapes” might have been the separate Friedlingen incident where boys allegedly locked up two girls and then raped them. They boys were held in Weil am Rhein. Some articles mistakenly connect these two events with the Cologne attacks, see here: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/german-police-arrest-three-syrian-7137962

While some others correctly state that they are unrelated: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3390042/The-fightback-begins-German-vigilante-group-vows-protect-women-migrant-attackers-three-Syrians-arrested-gang-raping-two-teenage-girls.html?ito=social-facebook

German privacy laws prevent the police from naming the suspects but it has confirmed they are not asylum-seekers.

None of the suspects were asylum seekers and prosecutors have said they do not believe the incident is connected to the wave of attacks against women in Cologne and other German cities over the New Year.

The alleged rapes occurred in the village of Friedlingen which is far from Cologne.

So the rapes possibly never were committed by refugees in the first place. The two alleged rapes were possibly not connected to the Cologne attacks and were not committed by refugees.

—-

The claim that there were “1000 men” of “North African or Arab appearance” in the so-called “sexual assaults” were “refugees” has been disputed.

It was claimed that seventeen 31 of the suspects were “Algerian or Moroccan”. But the ethnicities of the rest were unknown. There were also presumably two ethnic German men and one white U.S. citizen involved in those attacks.

“Seventeen of the 31 suspects were Algerian or Moroccan, a spokesman for the Interior Ministry said. The suspects also included two Germans and one U.S. citizen. The people were wanted for theft, bodily assault, and sexual offenses, according to the spokesman.”
http://www.wsj.com/articles/germany-says-asylum-seekers-among-suspects-in-cologne-new-years-eve-assaults-1452253734

If it’s true, then most of the suspects are unlikely to be refugees. According to Wikipedia, the vast majority of the refugees come from Syria, Kosovo, Afghanistan, Eritrea, and not from Algeria or Morocco. Algeria and Morocco are Northwest African countries, which are very far from Syria and Kosovo.

And you’re forgetting the pattern of the attacks:

“German officials finally admitted Monday that around 1,000 men of “North African or Arab” appearance were involved in sexual assaults and robbings against at least 90 women in Cologne on New Year’s Eve. The attacks, which police believe were coordinated between the hundreds of men involved, had a similar pattern: A lone woman would be surrounded by a dozen or so men and be aggressively groped and have her belongings taken away as the assaulters laughed and rejoiced. At least one woman was raped during her attack.”

In other words, the attacks usually come from organized gangs. And all of the attacks occurred in just one city, Cologne, on a single day during New Year’s Eve. It’s planned out. This is different from the assumption that these attacks are a routine “habit”.

There is also intentional distortion of information. The attacks weren’t just “sexual assaults”. The attacks also were thefts and bodily assaults.
http://in.reuters.com/article/germany-assaults-idINKBN0UM0V120160108

There have been suggestions that those behind the attacks may have been organized criminals using sexual assaults to distract their victims while they were robbed.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/germany/12082366/German-women-report-string-of-sexual-assaults-by-Arab-and-North-African-men.html

So the real goal of these organized gangs was not to “sexual assault” women but to rob women.

“Police have said the men appeared to have been coordinated, comparing their modus operandi to that of criminal gangs that have operated in strength for several years in the area and turning it into a place many Cologners avoid after dark. Known locally as antänzer (waltzers), the men snuggle up to their victims, often twisting a leg around them in an apparently playful fashion, which causes them to lose balance, whereupon the perpetrator uses the opportunity to whip a wallet or mobile phone from a pocket or bag.”

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jan/06/tensions-rise-in-germany-over-handling-of-mass-sexual-assaults-in-cologne

“Markus Niesczeri, a spokesman for Duesseldorf police, said that since the start of 2014, officers there have identified more than 2,000 suspects of North African origin in connection with organized thefts, though he did not say how many. He declined to say whether there have been any arrests in those cases.”

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/germany-police-cologne-sexual-assaults-criminal-network-refugees-migrants/

A German official stated that the sexual assaults and robberies were done by “foreign criminal gangs” who were not refugees. He said that they exploited the influx of refugees that makes it difficult to track offenders:

“The North Rhine-Westphalian state chairman of the Federal German Police, Sebastian Fiedler has, meanwhile, given the events of Cologne complained that foreign criminal Clans abusing refugees for their own purposes. “Both in the Arab clans as well as North African criminal groups, we have structural problems,” he said of the “Mitteldeutsche Zeitung”.

“These are gangs. People are undocumented and residence permit on the go and the criminal justice system. As you will find money laundering, illegal gambling, narcotics, robbery and theft offenses. And that is particularly bad, there are refugees addressed in order to acquire it.” This done through direct response, but also through social networks.

“Fiedler added that one must ‘protect the refugees before the said criminal groups who want to abuse it for their own purposes’. In addition, these criminal groups took advantage of the influx of refugees to track offenders. “This has nothing to do with the refugees themselves.”

Why are they supposedly targeting *only* women? Well, men were robbed too but it’s not reported much because it doesn’t carry the sensational aspect. Also it’s possibly because women are weaker so they are easier to be overpowered when robbing them.

Additionally, there were only two alleged rapes in Germany on New Year&#039s Eve. But the two “rapes” might have been the separate Friedlingen incident where boys allegedly locked up two girls and then raped them. They boys were held in Weil am Rhein. Some articles mistakengly connect these two events with the Cologne attacks, see here: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/german-police-arrest-three-syrian-7137962

while some others correctly state that they are unrelated: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3390042/The-fightback-begins-German-vigilante-group-vows-protect-women-migrant-attackers-three-Syrians-arrested-gang-raping-two-teenage-girls.html?ito=social-facebook

“German privacy laws prevent the police from naming the suspects but it has confirmed they are not asylum-seekers.”

“None of the suspects were asylum seekers and prosecutors have said they do not believe the incident is connected to the wave of attacks against women in Cologne and other German cities over the New Year.”

The alleged rapes occurred in the village of Friedlingen which is far from Cologne.

So the rapes probably never were committed by refugees in the first place. The two alleged rapes were probably not connected to the Cologne attacks and were not committed by refugees.

So it’s not proven that the sexual assaults and robberies were committed by refugees. Some of the suspects are refugees, but none of them are suspected to commit sexual assaults, only theft and physical assaults. Instead, the sexual assaults and robberies were possibly committed by “organized criminals” (who were mostly North African (Moroccan and Algerian) but also German and American) who were not refugees. Evidence supports this as there were similar criminal organizations before the influx of refugees, the crimes follow a organized pattern (using sexual assaults to distract women when committing theft) and the firecrackers threw into the crowds beforehand may be an intentional, organized attempt to distract the police. These organized criminals possibly exploited the influx of refugees which made the German police difficult to identify offenders.

Many people join criminal gangs because they are poor or unemployed. Minimum wage and related laws cause unemployment by pricing low-skilled workers out of the market, particularly among young, unskilled minorities. Germany has high minimum wage laws and this might have caused these North African men to be unemployed (who are not merely young and unskilled, but they also cannot speak German fluently), and this in turn, cause them to join criminal gangs and resort to robbery (and to commit sexual assault to distract women when committing theft). So the root of the problem is minimum wage laws and related laws. They need to be abolished.

If minimum wage laws are absent they could first join a low-skilled job and work their way up. This way taxpayers don’t have to provide education, food and housing for them. Additionally, in the absence of minimum wage laws, they could receive on-the-job training so they could learn the English language while working.

Is the Islamic State really genocidal?

The claim that the Islamic State (IS) is practicing genocide is disputed.

There were allegedly Yazidis being trapped in the mountains with no food or water. British journalist Matthew Barber have later Tweeted that the Yazidis were still alive but successfully escaped from the mountains:

Good news: almost certain there was no massacre in Hatimiya. The Iraqi minister disseminated a false report. Will have more updates soon.

Preface: very hard to get to bottom of conflicting/confused accounts—normal in states of chaos/trauma. Finally arrived at the following.

On D-Day, Hatimiya didn’t flee; mukhtar was powerful in the region w/lot of clout & relational capital; people felt they’d be protected. But on Wednesday, an “emir” of #IS came to Hatimiya & Kucho, delivering a convert-to-Islam ultimatum. He told the villages: “We’re not after your $ or women; we just want to inform you that you’re now part of the Islamic State and anyone in it must be Muslim.” Said he’d return Sunday to “hear their response.” Anticipating that US airstrikes would target nearby #IS positions, the villagers planned to make an escape when the bombing would throw IS into confusion. The airstrikes never came (to these particular IS positions). Hatimiya decided to flee anyway, did so on Sat night. All the families made it to the mountain alive, luckily not encountering jihadists. The village of Hatimiya is now empty, but because of the communal escape—not because of a massacre. On Sun. the emir returned, went first to Hatimiya, discovered it empty. Perturbed at the escape, he decided to place a watch over Kucho, to prevent the same from happening there. It’s not “surrounded” but monitored. Those inside feel they’ll be killed if they try to leave. Kucho remains in this state. The call to convert is real and remains active. The initial deadline passed, but no one has been executed. IS has supposedly not declared an “extension” of the conversion window; they just haven’t acted as of yet. Iraq’s human rights minister Mohammed Shia al-Sudani announced a massacre on Sunday, though he didn’t refer to Hatimiya (that I know of). That this report of killing coinciding with the passing of the conversion deadline, which was real, in the Kuchu/Hatimiya area, led to inferences that Hatimiya was the site of a massacre. Al-Sudani’s reports of a massacre could still be true, if they refer to a separate incident, though the news stopped carrying the report Monday. The 500 figure may also refer to fighters killed in multiple locations. Al-Sudani also mentioned live burials & 100s of women taken as slaves—haven’t seen anything yet on the former. People in Kucho were alive as of yesterday, but they didn’t answer my calls today. Will try again tomorrow.

Same thing reported in these eyewitness accounts:

The 40,000 Yazidis stranded on the mountain. That was the pretext for US military intervention in Iraq, as set out by President Obama last Thursday. The air war was commenced, and officials were talking up sending ground forces for “rescue” operations as recently as this afternoon.

But a funny thing happened when the US “advisers” got to Mount Sinjar. There weren’t 40,000 starving Yazidis stranded there. In fact, the indications are that there never were, and the Pentagon quickly dropped the “rescue” plan.

In addition, there was a separate incident where a Yazidi woman was killed by her own Yazadi people for marrying a Sunni Muslim Boy. When the IS captured the city called “Bashiqa”, an IS representative on Twitter twitted that the city was renamed to Dua in honor of the Yadzi who was murdered. (“Dua” means “prayers”.)

The claims about the IS genocide against Christians were grossly exaggerated. The IS warned to Christians that they could either convert to Islam, pay a tax known as the jizya, leave, or die. Rich Christians are expected to pay $715 per year, middle class Christians half the amount at $375 and the poor Christians a quarter of the amount or $178. Furthermore, the jizya is only imposed on military-aged males. Women, children, elders are exempted from the jizya. Christians who are in the IS army are exempted as well.

This video of an IS judge also confirms that Christians are entitled to live
safely if they pay the jizya. See this video. (Time is at 30:00.)

The leader of al-Qaeda in Iraq, the precursor of the Islamic State, said that he does not target Christians.

We have already said that we did not target Christians or any other civilians … All that we said is that there are various confessions in the land of the two rivers (Iraq), like the Yazidis, the Chaldeans, the Assyrians and we did not extend an arm to harm them… even though they are not linked to Islam. … It has been proven to us that they have not participated with the Crusaders in the killings of the mujahedeens (Islamic fighters) and did not play the vile role played by the rejectionists (Shiites).

However, the myth that the IS murders Christian civilians persists. This has partly to do with the notion that many Christians are gone in many of the Iraqi cities. They are gone not because they are killed but because they have fled. This has confused many people (including a prominent Christian religious figure in Iraq) into believing that the Christians in his city were massacred.

Isn’t enough evidence that the IS kills other religious minorities. The IS is allied with the Sufi and pro-Saddam secularist militias.

The IS actually saved the lives of some Indian nurses. They warned the Indian nurses that a hospital is about to be bombed and they have provided protection, food and shelter for the nurses until they safely migrated to India:

What about the Shiites?

A famous video which was broadcasted on all major media outlets to show the ‘brutality’ of Islamic State’s policy on civilians. It is purported to show that IS were killing Shia civilians on highway drive by shooting. (Source: Al Furqan Media – Clanging of the Swords) If one were to watch the whole documentary of the Islamic State which the clip was taken from, they would know that those who were being targeted were Iraqi Gov’t members who took part in oppressing the Sunnis of Iraq. They were selective targets from a list the IS had obtained. The people targeted were known criminals of the Iraqi government. Then there is another clip (Source: Al Furqan Media- Cutting Assads Supply Line) which shows a transport truck being pulled over on a highway by the Islamic State. The Allawite men are being questioned. Some of the questions are of religious nature. Then they are shown being executed. Once again, if one watched the whole documentary, they would have seen what the members of the Islamic State found out from the documents obtained of the truck drivers. They were on route to transporting military gear for Assads army. Does this make them khawarij? If they applied their state law to these people whom they charged with a crime, why don’t they have a right to administer justice on their terms, especially if they’re applying the Shar’ee rules?

Many of the civilians that were killed were prominent leaders of the former administration, alleged spies against the IS, people who were fleeing from the IS (it’s illegal to flee from the IS), civilians who are killed accidentally during mutual warfare, and people who died from IS-perpetrated terrorist attacks abroad.

Before the U.S. begun airstrikes against the Islamic State, there was a report of the IS forcing female genital mutilation on women. This has caused widespread hysteria. But later the reports about female genital mutilation turned out to be false.

Just yesterday, there was a report about women and children in one of the IS’s graveyards.

The deaths of the women and children could be from the Islamic State. But the deaths of the women and children could also be from U.S. airstrikes. We don’t know their cause yet. But if indeed the deaths were later to be found to be caused by the Islamic State, it still does not make the U.S. innocent because almost certainly the U.S. airstrikes against the Islamic State kills women and children too, and it is the U.S. which has created and expanded the Islamic State.

Still, we can’t be sure. There was an older incident of mass graves. An Iraqi minister claimed that 500 Yizidis, including women, children, killed, buried alive in a mass grave, but it used a picture from Assad’s barrel bombings used as “proof” for the “crimes” committed by the IS.